Visiting Professional - Counsel Support Section
International Criminal Court (ICC)
Legal Affairs
Location: The Hague (Netherlands)
Occupations: Legal Affairs
H Hardship
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Added 6 months ago
Job Description

19418 | Registry

Organisational Unit: Counsel Support Section, Registry
Duty Station: The Hague - NL
Contract Duration: To be determined
Deadline for Applications: 31/12/2020

Required Documents for This Application

Please note that you will need to have the following information ready in order to complete your application:

  • A completed “Duties and Responsibilities Form” (refer to step 1 on your eRecruitment Profile page).
  • Motivation letter (maximum of 400 words).
  • One reference letter.
  • Optional: short essay or a writing sample on a subject relevant to the work of the Court (maximum of 750 words, single spaced, type written).

Contract Duration

Visiting Professionals are required to work full time for a period between one and six months (to be agreed to prior to commencement). Visiting Professional placements shall not be extended beyond six months.

Organisational Context

The Counsel Support Section (CSS) is in charge of centralizing and coordinating all assistance provided to counsel by the Court. It serves as the Registry’s focal point for the Offices of Public Counsel, which depend on the Registry solely for administrative purposes, and also provides logistical and administrative assistance. The Section also manages the Court’s programme of legal aid for indigent defendants and victims and handles all provisions relating to the activities of the Court’s disciplinary organs.

Duties and Responsibilities

Visiting professionals are expected to carry out one or more research projects relevant to the mandate of the Section and contribute to the improvement of its policies and procedures, as agreed with the Section Chief.

Required Qualifications

Education:

All candidates must have a relevant degree from a recognised university; an advanced degree will be a strong asset. Candidates are expected to have a very good record of academic performance.

Experience:

Visiting Professional placements focus on candidates who have extensive experience in their professional careers in relevant fields of work. Practical experience that is relevant to the work of the Court may be considered an asset. Candidates for a Visiting Professional placement must have at least 3 (three) years of relevant professional experience.

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:

  • Excellent drafting skills;
  • Excellent research and analytical skills;
  • Ability to adapt to multicultural and multilingual working environments;
  • Strong teamwork skills (listens, consults and communicates proactively);
  • Good computer skills (including Microsoft Office applications).

Knowledge of Languages:

Proficiency in one of the working languages of the Court, French or English, is required. Working knowledge of the other is desirable. Knowledge of another official language of the Court (Arabic, Chinese, Russian and Spanish) is an asset.

Other criteria:

In line with the ICC’s efforts to improve geographical representation among staff, nationals of the countries listed below are strongly encouraged to apply.

Non-represented or under-represented countries at the ICC as of 30 November 2019: Afghanistan, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Austria, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cabo Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, Comoros, Congo, Cook Islands, Costa Rica, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Estonia, Fiji, Gabon, Germany, Grenada, Guyana, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Japan, Jordan, Latvia, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Maldives, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Montenegro, Namibia, Nauru, North Macedonia, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Republic of Korea, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Seychelles, Slovakia, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Timor-Leste, Tunisia, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Zambia.

Remuneration

Please note that the ICC is not able to provide all participants in the Internship and Visiting Professional Programme with remuneration, nor is it possible to provide reimbursement for expenses incurred during the internship or visiting professional placement.

Applicants should therefore be able to support themselves for the duration of their internship or placement.

Limited funding may, however, be available through the ICC’s Trust Fund for the Development of Interns and Visiting Professionals, which receives donations from States Parties and other donors to fund nationals of States Parties from developing regions. These donations are equally divided between the four Organs of the Court.

If funding is available, the Human Resources Section shall assess a candidate’s eligibility in accordance with the terms of reference of the Trust Fund as agreed by the donors.

In order to be eligible, the applicant must, among other criteria, be a national from a country that is a State Party to the Rome Statue and appears on the United Nations Statistics Division’s list of developing regions.

Candidates eligible for funding shall receive detailed information and further instructions after the selection process is finalized. Stipends will always be agreed at the time of offering the internship. No funding will be provided at a later stage.

About ICC
​The International Criminal Court (ICC) investigates and, where warranted, tries individuals charged with the gravest crimes of concern to the international community: genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity and the crime of aggression.

The Court is participating in a global fight to end impunity, and through international criminal justice, the Court aims to hold those responsible accountable for their crimes and to help prevent these crimes from happening again. ​​

The Court cannot reach these goals alone. As a court of last resort, it seeks to complement, not replace, national Courts. Governed by an international treaty called the Rome Statute, the ICC is the world’s first permanent international criminal court.

Justice is a key prerequisite for lasting peace. International justice can contribute to long‐term peace, stability and equitable development in post‐conflict societies. These elements are foundational for building a future free ​of violence. ​​