Short term Internship reserved for students with disabilities
European Council for Nuclear Research (CERN)
CERN
Location: Geneva (Switzerland)
Grade: Intern
Occupations: General Support
H Hardship
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Added 3 weeks ago
Job Description

Company Description

At CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, physicists and engineers are probing the fundamental structure of the universe. Using the world's largest and most complex scientific instruments, they study the basic constituents of matter - fundamental particles that are made to collide together at close to the speed of light. The process gives physicists clues about how particles interact, and provides insights into the fundamental laws of nature. Find out more on http://home.cern.

Diversity has been an integral part of CERN's mission since its foundation and is an established value of the Organization.

Job Description

** Version française de ce poste disponible sur https://careers.cern/SESH **

One of CERN’s key missions is education. Our professionals very much enjoy sharing their knowledge and expertise with students who are committed and passionate about their chosen field.

Are you a student in a technical or scientific field, looking for an internship to apply your knowledge and get practical experience? Join us in the collaborative, knowledge-sharing and international environment of CERN, for a period up to 6 months.

Whilst CERN Jobs are open to all eligible candidates, as part of CERN’s commitment to advance inclusiveness and accessibility in the workplace this particular opportunity is reserved for students with disabilities.

Qualifications

In order to qualify for a place on the programme you will need to meet the following requirements:

  • You are a full-time student at undergraduate (post-secondary) or graduate level (doctoral students are not eligible).
  • You are residing in France or Switzerland [1].
  • You are at least 18 years of age.
  • You have full insurance cover valid in the Geneva area for medical expenses, work and private accidents.
  • Your main field of study is in applied physics, computing, mathematics, electricity, electronics, mechanical, electrical or civil engineering.
  • Your work at CERN is an obligatory or recommended part of your studies.
  • You will be returning to your educational establishment after completion of your stay at CERN.
  • You have working knowledge of English and/or French.

[1]: Currently limited to France and Switzerland during the pilot phase of the project.

Important information for you to know:

  • The duration of the internship is between 1 and 6 months.
  • You will receive a monthly allowance of 1516 Swiss Francs. Please note, however, that the cost of living in Geneva is high and this allowance is just a complement. You should have adequate financial resources to support yourself in the local area.
  • You will need to have full insurance cover valid in the Geneva area for medical expenses, work and private accidents as well as any disability arising from professional and non-professional illness and accidents.

Additional Information

This is how you can apply:

To apply for this position, click on the “I’m interested” button below, then fill in the necessary information and upload your CV.

Make sure you have your CV to hand as you start your application. Once submitted you will not be able to upload additional documents or edit your application.

You can apply for a place at any time throughout the year and can indicate your availabilities. Upon receipt, and typically within 2-3 working days, we will get back to you to acknowledge receipt and clarify any urgent questions you may have around the programme.

Please note that if a traineeship agreement is required by your institute, as an international organisation CERN will not sign external documents. You will therefore be required to use the CERN traineeship agreement provided on https://cds.cern.ch/record/1994294/files/convention_stage_6mois_en.pdf.

Please note that we have a limited number of places for this programme. You are encouraged to contact CERN’s Internship team on cern.internships@cern.ch if you have questions regarding the internship, including for matters of workplace accessibility or special needs.

About CERN

At an intergovernmental meeting of UNESCO in Paris in December 1951, the first resolution concerning the establishment of a European Council for Nuclear Research (in French Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire) was adopted.Two months later, an agreement was signed establishing the provisional Council – the acronym CERN was born.Today, our understanding of matter goes much deeper than the nucleus, and CERN's main area of research is particle physics. Because of this, the laboratory operated by CERN is often referred to as the European Laboratory for Particle Physics.

Physicists and engineers at CERN use the world's largest and most complex scientific instruments to study the basic constituents of matter – fundamental particles. Subatomic particles are made to collide together at close to the speed of light. The process gives us clues about how the particles interact, and provides insights into the fundamental laws of nature. We want to advance the boundaries of human knowledge by delving into the smallest building blocks of our universe.

The instruments used at CERN are purpose-built particle accelerators and detectors. Accelerators boost beams of particles to high energies before the beams are made to collide with each other or with stationary targets. Detectors observe and record the results of these collisions.Founded in 1954, the CERN laboratory sits astride the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva. It was one of Europe's first joint ventures and now has 23 member states.